Office of Research Computing

Woman wearing a red watch typing on a computer

The Office of Researching Computing advances computationally driven research by supporting computational facilities and architectures at the cutting edge of advanced computing. The office consists of the Center for Research Computing (CRC) and the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC).

The Center for Research Computing plays a vital role in furthering the productivity, innovation, and impact of Pitt research by collaborating with faculty in applying leading-edge computing to their work. CRC is a unique resource for disciplines that include engineering, chemistry, genomics, and linguistics, as well as economics, business, history, and political science. CRC’s research faculty consultants enable uncomplicated access to advanced computing by technically supporting computational facilities, architectures, and software, in addition to conducting training workshops and offering individual instruction.

The Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center is a joint effort between Pitt and Carnegie Mellon University. PSC is home to some of the most powerful systems for high performance computing, communications and data storage, and makes these systems available to scientists and engineers nationwide for unclassified research, providing them with a flexible environment for solving the largest and most challenging problems in science, engineering and digital scholarship.

Computing Clusters & Resources

H2P (Hail to Pitt) is the main cluster at the Center for Research Computing, supporting high-performance computing modes such as MPI, SMP, GPU, and VIZ.

Trainings & Workshops

Browse a list of all courses offered by CRC throughout the year. You also can download presentation and lecture slides, labs, and other materials from recent courses via your Box account.

User Support

CRC provides technical support as well as information on setting up a user account, allocations, policies, and documentation.

Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center

The PSC, a national leader in supercomputing, has enabled breakthroughs in many scientific disciplines by providing researchers nationwide with access to the most advanced computational systems available.